Poster Title Help For Essays

A while ago I talked about choosing a blog topic for your website, now I will show you how to come up with great headlines for your articles using a catchy title generator.

Picture this:

Your blog is up and running and you are almost finished writing a cool post packed full with useful information and just before hitting the publish button you start thinking “is this the best title for my article?

This happens to me a lot and I’m sure there are a lot of bloggers who struggle when it comes to writing catchy blog titles.

Brainstorming headlines works but unfortunately it takes too much time for me, that’s why I prefer using a catchy title generator.

Why?

Because it will generate hundreds of clickable headlines in seconds.

Sure you can make use of some headline writing tips but still the process can be a little time consuming.

So what’s a quicker faster way to come up with irresistible headlines for our posts?

First let’s see why headlines or catchy titles are so important.

Are Headlines that Important?

Think of it this way…

There are tons of articles published daily on the web.

Everybody tries to get ahead somehow, by optimizing the articles for search engines, ranking higher and so on.

The fact is that headlines play a very big role in your blog’s success.

It’s not enough to write the best content you can write you also have to come up with a cool title so that people will click on your site in search results and not on your competitor.

Great headlines can…

  • Grab your visitors attention
  • Increase CTR (click through rate)
  • Increase traffic to your website
  • Increase social shares

6+ Catchy Title Generator Tools

Here are some of the best catchy title generator tools so you can come up with endless awesome clickable blog titles in seconds.

 

1.) TweakYourBiz Title Generator

TweakYourBiz Title Generator is my favorite tool at the moment when it comes to blog title suggestions for my posts, simply because it doesn’t generate just one or 5 headlines it generates hundreds of them, how cool is that?

All you have to do is go through them and choose one that perfectly fits your content. Sure most won’t match your blog topic but usually you will find at least one that is just amazing.

 

2.) Portent’s Content Idea Generator

This is another simple to use catchy title generator. All you have to do is insert the subject or keyword and a clickable title will be automatically generated for you.

The downside is that you have to go through a few on them until you find one that fits your content. But still a very handy tool to have.

 

3.) HubSpot’s Blog Topic Generator

It’s quite easy to use HubSpot’s blog topic generator.

Just enter your keyword in the field and hit the button. Each time you will do this 5 titles will be generate for you.

 

4.) ContentIdeator

Again all you have to do is enter a keyword and hit the “Get Ideas” button.

Wait a moment and a list of awesome headlines will be generated.

That’s it.

Just choose whatever you like the most.

 

5.) Inboundnow: Blog Title Idea Generator

This one is a little different from above because you don’t have to enter any keywords.

The tool works by randomly generating cool headlines with a [blank] space for your keyword.

It’s more like a catchy template generator.

 

6.) Link Bait Title Generator

This one is my latest addition to this list post as it is a little different from the above.

As usual you will have to enter your subject but this time you have an option to choose the headline type, such as: fun, controversial, list or shocking which is pretty cool.

 

Other Resources

List of awesome blog post titles

Last but not least remember that no headline generator is perfect so you may want to tweak it a little.

I usually end up deleting/adding a word or two.

What about you?

How do you come up with catchy titles for your posts?

I love to hear your thoughts on this, let me know in the comments bellow

Creating a Poster

What exactly is a poster presentation?

A poster presentation combines text and graphics to present your project in a way that is visually interesting and accessible. It allows you to display your work to a large group of other scholars and to talk to and receive feedback from interested viewers.

Poster sessions have been very common in the sciences for some time, and they have recently become more popular as forums for the presentation of research in other disciplines like the social sciences, service learning, the humanities, and the arts.

Poster presentation formats differ from discipline to discipline, but in every case, a poster should clearly articulate what you did, how you did it, why you did it, and what it contributes to your field and the larger field of human knowledge.

What goals should I keep in mind as I construct my poster?

  1. Clarity of content. You will need to decide on a small number of key points that you want your viewers to take away from your presentation, and you will need to articulate those ideas clearly and concisely.

  2. Visual interest and accessiblity. You want viewers to notice and take interest in your poster so that they will pause to learn more about your project, and you will need the poster's design to present your research in a way that is easy for those viewers to make sense of it.

Who will be viewing my poster?

The answer to this question depends upon the context in which you will be presenting your poster. If you are presenting at a conference in your field, your audience will likely contain mostly people who will be familiar with the basic concepts you're working with, field-specific terminology, and the main debates facing your field and informing your research. This type of audience will probably most interested in clear, specific accounts of the what and the how of your project.

If you are presenting in a setting where some audience members may not be as familiar with your area of study, you will need to explain more about the specific debates that are current in your field and to define any technical terms you use. This audience will be less interested in the specific details and more interested in the what and why of your project—that is, your broader motivations for the project and its impact on their own lives.

How do I narrow my project and choose what to put on my poster?

Probably less than you would like! One of the biggest pitfalls of poster presentations is filling your poster with so much text that it overwhelms your viewers and makes it difficult for them to tell which points are the most important. Viewers should be able to skim the poster from several feet away and easily make out the most significant points.

The point of a poster is not to list every detail of your project. Rather, it should explain the value of your research project. To do this effectively, you will need to determine your take-home message. What is the single most important thing you want your audience to understand, believe, accept, or do after they see your poster?

Once you have an idea about what that take-home message is, support it by adding some details about what you did as part of your research, how you did it, why you did it, and what it contributes to your field and the larger field of human knowledge.

What kind of information should I include about what I did?

This is the raw material of your research: your research questions, a succinct statement of your project's main argument (what you are trying to prove), and the evidence that supports that argument. In the sciences, the what of a project is often divided into its hypothesis and its data or results. In other disciplines, the what is made up of a claim or thesis statement and the evidence used to back it up.

Remember that your viewers won't be able to process too much detailed evidence; it's your job to narrow down this evidence so that you're providing the big picture. Choose a few key pieces of evidence that most clearly illustrate your take-home message. Often a chart, graph, table, photo, or other figure can help you distill this information and communicate it quickly and easily.

What kind of information should I include about how I did it?

Include information about the process you followed as you conducted your project. Viewers will not have time to wade through too many technical details, so only your general approach is needed. Interested viewers can ask you for details.

What kind of information should I include about why I did it?

Give your audience an idea about your motivation for this project. What real-world problems or questions prompted you to undertake this project? What field-specific issues or debates influenced your thinking? What information is essential for your audience to be able to understand your project and its significance? In some disciplines, this information appears in the background or rationale section of a paper.

What kind of information should I include about its contribution?

Help your audience to see what your project means for you and for them. How do your findings impact scholars in your field and members of the broader intellectual community? In the sciences, this information appears in the discussion section of a paper.

How will the wording of my ideas on my poster be different from my research paper?

In general, you will need to simplify your wording. Long, complex sentences are difficult for viewers to absorb and may cause them to move on to the next poster. Poster verbiage must be concise, precise, and straightforward. And it must avoid jargon. Here is an example:

Wording in a paper: This project sought to establish the ideal specifications for clinically useful wheelchair pressure mapping systems, and to use these specifications to influence the design of an innovative wheelchair pressure mapping system.

Wording on a poster:

Aims of study

  • Define the ideal wheelchair pressure mapping system
  • Design a new system to meet these specifications

Once I have decided what to include, how do I actually design my poster?

The effectiveness of your poster depends on how quickly and easily your audience can read and interpret it, so it's best to make your poster visually striking. You only have a few seconds to grab attention as people wander past your poster; make the most of those seconds!

How are posters usually laid out?

In general, people expect information to flow left-to-right and top-to-bottom. Viewers are best able to absorb information from a poster with several columns that progress from left to right.

Even within these columns, however, there are certain places where viewers' eyes naturally fall first and where they expect to find information.

Imagine your poster with an upside-down triangle centered from the top to the bottom. It is in this general area that people tend to look first and is often used for the title, results, and conclusions. Secondary and supporting information tend to fall to the sides, with the lower right having the more minor information such as acknowledgements (including funding), and personal contact information.

  1. Main Focus Area
    Location of research fundamentals: Title, Authors, Institution, Abstract, Results, Conclusion
  2. Secondary Emphasis
    Location of important info: Intro, Results or Findings, Summary
  3. Supporting Area
    Location of supporting info: Methods, Discussion
  4. Final Info Area
    Location of supplemental info: References, Acknowledgments

How much space should I devote to each section?

This will depend on the specifics of your project. In general, remember that how much space you devote to each idea suggests how important that section is. Make sure that you allot the most space to your most important points.

How much white space should I leave on my poster?

White space is helpful to your viewers; it delineates different sections, leads the eye from one point to the next, and keeps the poster from being visually overwhelming. In general, leave 10—30% of your poster as white space.

Should I use graphics?

Absolutely! Visual aids are one of the most effective ways to make your poster visually striking, and they are often a great way to communicate complex information straightforwardly and succinctly. If your project deals with lots of empirical data, your best bet will be a chart, graph, or table summarizing that data and illustrating how that data confirms your hypothesis.

If you don't have empirical data, you may be able to incorporate photographs, illustrations, annotations, or other items that will pique your viewers' interest, communicate your motivation, demonstrate why your project is particularly interesting or unique.

Don't incorporate visual aids just for the sake of having a pretty picture on your poster. The visual aids should contribute to your overall message and convey some piece of information that your viewers wouldn't otherwise get just from reading your poster's text.

How can I make my poster easy to read?

There are a number of tricks you can use to aid readability and emphasize crucial ideas. In general:

  • Use a large font. Don't make the text smaller in order to fit more onto the poster. Make sure that 95% of the text on your poster can be read from 4 feet away. If viewers can't make out the text from a distance, they're likely to walk away.
  • Choose a sans-serif font like Helvetica or Verdana, not a serif font, like Times New Roman. Sans-serif fonts are easier to read because they don't have extraneous hooks on every letter. Here is an example of a sans-serif and a serif font:
  • Once you have chosen a font, be consistent in its usage. Use just one font.
  • Don't single-space your text. Use 1.5- or double-spacing to make the text easier to read.

For main points:

  • Use bold, italicized, or colored fonts, or enclose text in boxes. Save this kind of emphasis for only a few key words, phrases, or sentences. Too much emphasized text makes it harder, not easier, to locate important points.
  • AVOID USING ALL CAPITAL LETTERS, WHICH CAN BE HARD TO READ.
  • Make your main points easy to find by setting them off with bullets or numbers.

What is my role as the presenter of my poster?

When you are standing in front of your poster, you—and what you choose to say—are as important as the actual poster. Be ready to talk about your project, answer viewers' questions, provide additional details about your project, and so on.

How should I prepare for my presentation?

Once your poster is finished, you should re-familiarize yourself with the larger project you're presenting. Remind yourself about those details you ended up having to leave out of the poster, so that you will be able to bring them up in discussions with viewers. Then, practice, practice, practice!

Show your poster to advisors, professors, friends, and classmates before the day of the symposium to get a feel for how viewers might respond. Prepare a four- to five-minute overview of the project, where you walk these pre-viewers through the poster, drawing their attention to the most critical points and filling in interesting details as needed. Make note of the kinds of questions these pre-viewers have, and be ready to answer those questions. You might even consider making a supplemental handout that provides additional information or answers predictable questions.

How long should I let audience members look at the poster before engaging them in discussion?

Don't feel as if you have to start talking to viewers the minute they stop in front of your poster. Give them a few moments to read and process the information. Once viewers have had time to acquaint themselves with your project, offer to guide them through the poster. Say something like "Hello. Thanks for stopping to view my poster. Would you like a guided tour of my project?" This kind of greeting often works better than simply asking "Do you have any questions?" because after only a few moments, viewers might not have had time to come up with questions, even though they are interested in hearing more about your project.

Should I read from my poster?

No! Make sure you are familiar enough with your poster that you can talk about it without looking at it. Use the poster as a visual aid, pointing to it when you need to draw viewers' attention to a chart, photograph, or particularly interesting point.

Sample Posters

Click on the links to the right to open a PDF of each sample poster.

 

 

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